Article

Utility of large-linked databases in vaccine safety, particularly in distinguishing independent and synergistic effects. The Vaccine Safety Datalink Investigators.

National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 4.31). 06/1995; 754:377-82.
Source: PubMed
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