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Oil biodegradation around roots. Nature 376:302

Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 08/1995; 376(6538):302. DOI: 10.1038/376302a0
Source: PubMed
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    • "One of the classical papers in the field of ‘natural’ rhizoremediation is a report by Radwan and colleagues (1995) showing that plants growing in sand contaminated by oil spills after the Gulf War exhibited clean roots due to the removal of aromatic hydrocarbons by microorganisms. Although there are many reports about rhizoremediation experiments under laboratory conditions (reviewed by Zhuang et al., 2007), there are fewer examples in the scientific literature detailing the successful removal of pollutants from contaminated soils in ‘real’ scenarios via the concept of ‘designed’ rhizoremediation. "
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    ABSTRACT: With the increase in quality of life standards and the awareness of environmental issues, the remediation of polluted sites has become a priority for society. Because of the high economic cost of physico-chemical strategies for remediation, the use of biological tools for cleaning-up contaminated sites is a very attractive option. Rhizoremediation, the use of rhizospheric microorganisms in the bioremediation of contaminants, is the biotechnological approach that we explore in this minireview. We focus our attention on bacterial interactions with the plant surface, responses towards root exudates, and how plants and microbes communicate. We analyse certain strategies that may improve rhizoremediation, including the utilization of endophytes, and finally we discuss several rhizoremediation strategies that have opened ways to improve biodegradation.
    Microbial Biotechnology 07/2009; 2(4):452-64. DOI:10.1111/j.1751-7915.2009.00113.x · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    • "The rhizospheres of the four tested crop plants were rich in hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms. This result confirms and consolidates an earlier finding on other plants in our laboratory (Radwan et al., 1995, 1998, 2000, 2005) and, in addition, shows that the phyllospheres also were rich in such bacteria. Bacterial genera identified in the rhizospheres and phyllospheres were also recorded by earlier authors, as dominant bacteria in other oil-contaminated soils (Joshi and Walia, 1996; Reilley, Banks, and Schab, 1996; Daane et al., 2001, Tesar, Reichenauer, and Sessitsch, 2002;Okerentugba and Ezeronye, 2003; Salleh et al., 2003). "
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    ABSTRACT: The rhizospheres and phyllospheres of peas, beans, tomatoes, and squash raised in a desert sand soil mixed with 0.5% crude oil were rich in oil-utilizing bacteria and accommodated large numbers of free-living diazotrophic bacteria, with potential for hydrocarbon utilization. According to their 16S rRNA-sequences, the cultivable oil-utilizing bacteria were affiliated with the following genera, arranged in decreasing frequency: Bacillus, Ochrobactrum, Enterobacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Pontola, Nocardia, and Pseudoxanthomonas. Diazotrophic isolates were affiliated with Rhizobium, Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Leifsonia, Cellulosimicrobium, Stenotrophomonas, Kocuria, Arthrobacter, and Brevibacillus. The crude oil-utilizing and diazotrophic isolates grew, with varying growth intensities, on individual aliphatic (C(8) to C(40)) and aromatic hydrocarbons, as sole sources of carbon and energy. Quantitative gas liquid chromatographic measurements showed that representative bacterial isolates eliminated pure n-hexadecane, n-decosane, phenanthrene, and crude oil from the surrounding liquid media. Cultivation of oily sand-soil samples with any of the four tested crops led to enhanced oil degradation in that soil, as compared with the degradation in uncultivated oily sand-soil samples.
    International Journal of Phytoremediation 01/2009; 11(1):11-27. DOI:10.1080/15226510802363261 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    • "The rhizospheres of the four tested crop plants were rich in hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms. This result confirms and consolidates an earlier finding on other plants in our laboratory (Radwan et al., 1995, 1998, 2000, 2005) and, in addition, shows that the phyllospheres also were rich in such bacteria. Bacterial genera identified in the rhizospheres and phyllospheres were also recorded by earlier authors, as dominant bacteria in other oil-contaminated soils (Joshi and Walia, 1996; Reilley, Banks, and Schab, 1996; Daane et al., 2001, Tesar, Reichenauer, and Sessitsch, 2002;Okerentugba and Ezeronye, 2003; Salleh et al., 2003). "
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