Article

Correlation of striatal dopamine release and peripheral hypertension after transient ischemia in gerbils.

Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia - Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Journal of Vascular Surgery (Impact Factor: 2.98). 09/1995; 22(2):135-41. DOI: 10.1016/S0741-5214(95)70107-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Intracranial norepinephrine release has been associated with post-carotid endarterectomy hypertension in human beings. To study this phenomenon under more controlled conditions, we studied the relationship of cerebral catecholamines and blood pressure in gerbils, whose cerebral circulation is similar to that in human beings.
Twelve anesthetized gerbils underwent iliac artery blood pressure monitoring and in vivo electrochemistry catecholamine monitoring with use of catecholamine-specific electrodes placed stereotactically into the cerebral striatum. Six gerbils underwent 10 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (ischemic), whereas six underwent carotid artery dissection without occlusion (control).
The control group demonstrated a continuous gradual decline in blood pressure and striatal catecholamine during the 150-minute observation period. In contrast the ischemic gerbils demonstrated a sharp catecholamine rise during ischemia, a marked catecholamine drop shortly after carotid artery unclamping, and then a secondary larger catecholamine release that peaks in 60 minutes and gradually returns to baseline in 120 minutes. The blood pressure closely followed the catecholamine levels, with a sharp 20 mm Hg rise in blood pressure above baseline during carotid artery occlusion, followed by a dramatic 10 mm Hg drop below baseline after carotid artery unclamping and then a gradual rise of the blood pressure 25 mm Hg above baseline, which peaks in 80 minutes, with a gradual decline to the same blood pressure as in the control subjects 120 minutes after ischemia.
We conclude that striatal catecholamine release correlates with peripheral blood pressure during transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. This phenomenon may explain the mechanism of post-carotid endarterectomy hypertension in human beings, and this gerbil model can be used to study its prevention and treatment.

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