Article

The value of incorporating avoidable factors into perinatal audits.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kalafong Hospital, University of Pretoria.
South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde (Impact Factor: 1.71). 04/1995; 85(3):145-7.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To assess whether incorporating a system of identifying, classifying and grading avoidable factors into a perinatal audit can be useful in identifying problem areas.
Descriptive study.
Black urban population, Pretoria, South Africa.
All perinatal deaths of infants weighing more than 1,000 g from urban areas served by Kalafong Hospital between August 1991 and July 1992.
All perinatal deaths were classified according to the primary obstetric cause of death and neonatal cause of death, and whether any avoidable factors were present which could have contributed to the death.
The perinatal mortality rate was 26/1,000 deliveries. Avoidable factors occurred in 58% of perinatal deaths. Our problem areas which were immediately remedial were identified as labour management-related problems, administrative problems in obtaining syphilis results, and estimation of fetal weight. Other problem areas which need to be solved are patient education, early attendance at clinics, improved documentation and continuing education of medical personnel.
The use of this classification of avoidable factors has enabled the detection of problem areas that can be improved immediately at very little cost.

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