Article

Subjective fatigue of C-141 aircrews during Operation Desert Storm.

Armstrong Laboratory/CFTO, Brooks AFB, TX 78235-5104.
Human Factors The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Impact Factor: 1.29). 07/1994; 36(2):339-49. DOI: 10.1177/001872089403600213
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Airlift crews were exposed to extended work periods, reduced sleep periods, night work, and circadian dysrhythmia caused by shift work and time-zone crossings during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. This research reveals the extent to which severe subjective fatigue was experienced by the crews during Operation Desert Storm. In addition, through the evaluation of long-term and short-term work and sleep histories, this research shows that recent sleep and flight histories are correlated with high fatigue levels. Furthermore, we found a tendency for fatigue to correspond with pilot error. We recommend that the training of personnel involved in long-duration operations include fatigue management strategies and, further, that work policies and environments be designed to take into account the importance of regular and restorative sleep when unusual duty hours are required.

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