Article

Atypical depression. A valid clinical entity?

New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York.
Psychiatric Clinics of North America (Impact Factor: 2.13). 10/1993; 16(3):479-95.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The history of atypical depression is summarized, and the results of several treatment outcome studies are reviewed. A number of clinical course, family, and biologic variables in patients with atypical depression are investigated, and these patients are compared with patients with other depressive conditions. The Atypical Depression Diagnostic Scale Question Book also is presented.

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