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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine the physical activity levels and awareness of the influence of physical activity and overweight/obesity on breast cancer risk among NHS breast screening programme (NHSBSP) attendees. One hundred and eighty-eight (white British = 95%; post-menopausal = 80%) attendees completed a demographic and anthropometric data questionnaire, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and awareness of breast cancer risk factors questionnaire. IPAQ data were reported as continuous measures (MET-min·week(-1)) and as categorical variables (low, moderate and high activities). The highest median physical activity levels were reported in the domestic physical activity domain (756 MET-min·week(-1)). Most participants were categorized as 'moderately active' (45%), while 30% were classified in the 'high activity' and 25% as 'low activity' categories. Almost a third of participants (30%) reported no leisure-time physical activity and 83% reported no vigorous physical activity. There was high awareness of the effects of physical activity (75%) and obesity (80%) on breast cancer risk. No significant differences were found between physical activity categories and awareness that physical activity can reduce breast cancer risk (p > 0.05). However, compared with moderate and high activity categories, participants in the 'low activity' category were significantly more likely to respond that they thought they achieved recommended physical activity levels (p < 0.05). Participants who are unaware of their inadequate physical activity levels may have a less positive intention to increase physical activity levels. Practical strategies aimed to increase knowledge of the recommended physical activity guidelines and facilitate the achievement of these guidelines may be required for NHSBSP attendees.
    Health Promotion International 07/2014; · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of treatment for serious mental illness. Data were derived from the National Comorbidity Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative household survey assessing the presence and correlates of mental disorders and treatments. Crude and adjusted likelihoods of receiving treatment for serious mental illness in the previous 12 months were calculated. Forty percent of respondents with serious mental illness had received treatment in the previous year. Of those receiving treatment, 38.9% received care that could be considered at least minimally adequate, resulting in 15.3% of all respondents with serious mental illness receiving minimally adequate treatment. Predictors of not receiving minimally adequate treatment included being a young adult or an African American, residing in the South, being diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder, and being treated in the general medical sector. Inadequate treatment of serious mental illness is an enormous public health problem. Public policies and cost-effective interventions are needed to improve both access to treatment and quality of treatment.
    American Journal of Public Health 02/2002; 92(1):92-8. · 4.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the number of people in the United States with untreated serious mental illness (SMI) and the reasons for their lack of treatment. DATA SOURCE/STUDY DESIGN: The National Comorbidity Survey; cross-sectional, nationally representative household survey. An operationalization of the SMI definition set forth in the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration Reorganization Act identified individuals with SMI in the 12 months prior to the interview. The presence of SMI then was related to the use of mental health services in the past 12 months. Of the 6.2 percent of respondents who had SMI in the year prior to interview, fewer than 40 percent received stable treatment. Young adults and those living in nonrural areas were more likely to have unmet needs for treatment. The majority of those who received no treatment felt that they did not have an emotional problem requiring treatment. Among those who did recognize this need, 52 percent reported situational barriers, 46 percent reported financial barriers, and 45 percent reported perceived lack of effectiveness as reasons for not seeking treatment. The most commonly reported reason both for failing to seek treatment (72 percent) and for treatment dropout (58 percent) was wanting to solve the problem on their own. Although changes in the financing of services are important, they are unlikely by themselves to eradicate unmet need for treatment of SMI. Efforts to increase both self-recognition of need for treatment and the patient centeredness of care also are needed.
    Health Services Research 01/2002; 36(6 Pt 1):987-1007. · 2.49 Impact Factor