Article

Health care and nursing in Romania.

MGH Institute of Health Professions, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.
Journal of Advanced Nursing (Impact Factor: 1.53). 06/1996; 23(5):1045-9.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Health care and the nursing profession have been affected dramatically by political and socio-economic conditions in Romania. The Romanian Ministry of Health has recognized the health problems and barriers to care delivery which exist in the country, with several goals identified to improve the status of Romanian health care. This paper explores the critical issues which have impacted on health care and nursing in Romania.

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