Article

Familial hemiplegic migraine and episodic ataxia type-2 are caused by mutations in the Ca2+ channel gene CACNL1A4.

MGC-Department of Human Genetics, Sylvius Laboratory, Leiden University, The Netherlands.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 12/1996; 87(3):543-52.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Genes for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and episodic ataxia type-2 (EA-2) have been mapped to chromosome 19p13. We characterized a brain-specific P/Q-type Ca2+ channel alpha1-subunit gene, CACNL1A4, covering 300 kb with 47 exons. Sequencing of all exons and their surroundings revealed polymorphic variations, including a (CA)n-repeat (D19S1150), a (CAG)n-repeat in the 3'-UTR, and different types of deleterious mutations in FHM and EA-2. In FHM, we found four different missense mutations in conserved functional domains. One mutation has occurred on two different haplotypes in unrelated FHM families. In EA-2, we found two mutations disrupting the reading frame. Thus, FHM and EA-2 can be considered as allelic channelopathies. A similar etiology may be involved in common types of migraine.

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