Article

The use of transplanted glial cells to reconstruct glial environments in the CNS.

Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine and MRC Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, UK.
Brain Pathology (Impact Factor: 4.74). 11/1995; 5(4):443-50. DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-3639.1995.tb00623.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Transplantation studies have demonstrated that glia-depleted areas of the CNS can be reconstituted by the introduction of cultured cells. Thus, the influx of Schwann cells into glia-free areas of demyelination in the spinal cord can be prevented by the combined introduction of astrocytes and cells of the O-2A lineage. Although Schwann cell invasion of areas of demyelination is associated with destruction of astrocytes, the transplantation of rat tissue culture astrocytes ("type-1") alone cannot suppress this invasion, indicating a role for cells of the O-2A lineage in reconstruction of glial environments. By transplanting different glial cell preparations and manipulating lesions so as to prevent meningeal cell and Schwann cell proliferation it is possible to demonstrate that the behaviour of tissue culture astrocytes ("type-1") and astrocytes derived from O-2A progenitor cells ("type-2") is different. In the presence of meningeal cells, tissue culture astrocytes clump together to form cords of cells. In contrast, type-2 astrocytes spread throughout glia-free areas in a manner unaffected by the presence of meningeal cells or Schwann cells. Thus, progenitor-derived astrocytes show a greater ability to fill glia-free areas than tissue culture astrocytes. Similarly, when introduced into infarcted white matter in the spinal cord, progenitor-derived astrocytes fill the malacic area more effectively than tissue culture astrocytes, although axons do not regenerate into the reconstituted area.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
63 Views

Similar Publications