Article

Biochemical characterization of FMDV A10 and A22 subtypes by PAGE and IEF.

FMD Research Centre, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Hebbal, Bangalore, India.
Comparative Immunology Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 1.81). 02/1997; 20(1):95-9. DOI: 10.1016/S0147-9571(96)00010-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Both polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and iso-electric focusing (IEF) have been standardized using the sucrose density gradient purified 146S particles of FMD virus subtypes A10 and A22. Differences in the molecular weights of structural proteins (VP1, VP2 and VP3 of two subtypes (A10 and A22) of FMDV have been revealed in PAGE but no appreciable differences in the pI of VP1, VP2 and VP3 is found in IEF.

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