Article

Torsades de Pointes associated with intravenous haloperidol in critically ill patients.

Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States
The American Journal of Cardiology (Impact Factor: 3.43). 01/1998; 81(2):238-40. DOI: 10.1016/S0002-9149(97)00888-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this retrospective case-control study, 8 of 223 consecutive patients (3.6%) treated with intravenous haloperidol developed torsades de pointes, and were compared with 41 patients randomly selected as controls. The likelihood of torsades de pointes associated with intravenous haloperidol is significantly greater in patients receiving > or = 35 mg over 24 hours or in those with a QTc interval of >500 ms, or both.

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