Article

Associations between body condition and disease in cats.

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401, USA.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (Impact Factor: 1.67). 07/1998; 212(11):1725-31.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine the association between body condition and disease in cats.
Prospective study.
Information on 1,457 cats without major illnesses from 27 veterinary hospitals in the northeastern United States.
Cats that had body conditions determined from 1991 to 1992, using a set of 6 body condition silhouettes, had their health experiences and body conditions assessed for the subsequent 4.5 years. Cats were described by the following 6 body conditions: cachectic, lean, optimally lean, optimal weight, heavy, and obese. Data obtained from medical records and owner interviews were collected, using standard forms. Associations between body condition and specific diseases were analyzed. Findings in cats with body conditions other than optimal were compared with findings in cats with optimal body condition.
Compared with optimal weight cats, heavy cats were 2.9 times as likely to be taken to veterinarians because of lameness not associated with cat bite abscesses. Obese cats were also 3.9 times as likely to develop diabetes mellitus, 2.3 times as likely to develop nonallergic skin conditions, and 4.9 times as likely to develop lameness requiring veterinary care. Cats considered thin (cachectic and lean) were 1.7 times as likely to be presented to veterinary hospitals for diarrhea.
Results of this study substantiate reports of health risks associated with excess body weight in cats. Efforts to reduce weight in heavy and obese cats can lead to reduced risks of diabetes mellitus, lameness (presumably related to osteoarthritis and soft-tissue injuries), and skin problems unrelated to allergies. Cachectic and lean cats are more likely to have diarrhea that is not associated with a definitive diagnosis.

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    ABSTRACT: not store these pages in any form except for your own personal use. All other usage or distribution is illegal under international copyright treaties. Permission to use any of these pages in any other way besides the before mentioned must be gained in writing from the publisher. This article is exclusively copyrighted in its entirety to OJVR. This article may be copied once but may not be, reproduced or re-transmitted without the express permission of the editors. This journal satisfies the refereeing requirements (DEST) for the Higher Education Research Data Collection (Australia). Linking: To link to this page or any pages linking to this page you must link directly to this page only here rather than put up your own page. ABSTRACT Pothiappan P, Parthiban S., Juvenile diabetes mellitus in a domestic cat and its clinical management, Onl J Vet Res., 17(8):416-418, 2013. Diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency of insulin that results in the inability of the body's tissues and organs to properly utilize glucose. A six month old female cat weighing about 2.5kg was presented to the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex with the history of going down in condition. Detailed history revealed polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and cachexia. On clinical examination rectal temperature was found to be 38.5 o c with congested conjunctival mucus membranes. Blood, serum and urine samples were collected for further detailed analysis. Haematology revealed Hb 7.2gm %, TLC 12,500 cells / mm, DLC to be Neutrophils 60% and Lymphocytes 40%. Estimation of fasting serum glucose level revealed hyperglycemia (415mg %). Urine was found positive for glucose (+++) by Benedict's qualitative test. The case was diagnosed as Diabetes mellitus and treated with insulin 0.5 U/ kg b.wt s/c bid. The animal showed clinical improvement a week after the start of treatment and the owner was advised to continue the treatment further. INTRODUCTION
    1 12/2013; Lambert mic publishing, Germany., ISBN: 978-3-659-50196-8
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: not store these pages in any form except for your own personal use. All other usage or distribution is illegal under international copyright treaties. Permission to use any of these pages in any other way besides the before mentioned must be gained in writing from the publisher. This article is exclusively copyrighted in its entirety to OJVR. This article may be copied once but may not be, reproduced or re-transmitted without the express permission of the editors. This journal satisfies the refereeing requirements (DEST) for the Higher Education Research Data Collection (Australia). Linking: To link to this page or any pages linking to this page you must link directly to this page only here rather than put up your own page. ABSTRACT Pothiappan P, Parthiban S., Juvenile diabetes mellitus in a domestic cat and its clinical management, Onl J Vet Res., 17(8):416-418, 2013. Diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency of insulin that results in the inability of the body's tissues and organs to properly utilize glucose. A six month old female cat weighing about 2.5kg was presented to the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex with the history of going down in condition. Detailed history revealed polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and cachexia. On clinical examination rectal temperature was found to be 38.5 o c with congested conjunctival mucus membranes. Blood, serum and urine samples were collected for further detailed analysis. Haematology revealed Hb 7.2gm %, TLC 12,500 cells / mm, DLC to be Neutrophils 60% and Lymphocytes 40%. Estimation of fasting serum glucose level revealed hyperglycemia (415mg %). Urine was found positive for glucose (+++) by Benedict's qualitative test. The case was diagnosed as Diabetes mellitus and treated with insulin 0.5 U/ kg b.wt s/c bid. The animal showed clinical improvement a week after the start of treatment and the owner was advised to continue the treatment further. INTRODUCTION
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