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Microsatellite markers for genetic population studies in Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae).

CIRADES Bobo Dioylasso, Burkina Faso.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 4.38). 07/1998; 849:39-44. DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1998.tb11031.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Little is known about intraspecific variability in tsetse flies and its consequences for vectorial capacity. Microsatellite markers have been developed for Glossina palpalis gambiensis. Three loci have been identified and showed size polymorphisms for insectarium samples. G. palpalis gambiensis from Burkina Faso were also subjected to PCR to investigate then genetic variability. Amplifications were observed in different species belonging to the palpalis group. These molecular markers will be useful to estimate gene flow within G. palpalis gambiensis populations and analysis could be extended to related species.

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