Article

The retrosplenial cortex and emotion: new insights from functional neuroimaging of the human brain.

Dept of Psychiatry and Center for Neuroscience, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95817, USA.
Trends in Neurosciences (Impact Factor: 12.9). 08/1999; 22(7):310-6. DOI: 10.1016/S0166-2236(98)01374-5
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Little is known about the function of the retrosplenial cortex and until recently, there was no evidence that it had any involvement in emotional processes. Surprisingly, recent functional neuroimaging studies show that the retrosplenial cortex is consistently activated by emotionally salient words. A review of the functional neuroimaging literature reveals a previously overlooked pattern of observations: the retrosplenial cortex is the cortical region most consistently activated by emotionally salient stimuli. Evidence that this region is also involved in episodic memory suggests that it might have a role in the interaction between emotion and episodic memory. Recognition that the retrosplenial cortex has a prominent role in the processing of emotionally salient stimuli invites further studies to define its specific functions and its interactions with other emotion-related brain regions.

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