Article

Evidence of altered energy metabolism in autistic children

Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, USA.
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 4.03). 06/1999; 23(4):635-41. DOI: 10.1016/S0278-5846(99)00022-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT 1. In this pilot study, the authors investigated the hypotheses there are increased concentrations of lactate in brain and plasma and reduced brain concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in autistic children. 2. NAA and lactate levels in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe and the cerebellum of 9 autistic children were compared to 5 sibling controls using MRS. Plasma lactate levels were measured in 15 autistic children compared to 15 children with epilepsy. 3. Preliminary results show lower levels of NAA cerebellum in autistic children (p = 0.043). Lactate was detected in the frontal lobe in one autistic boy, but was not detected any of the other autistic subjects or siblings. 4. Plasma lactate levels were higher in the 15 autistic children compared to 15 children with epilepsy (p = 0.0003). 5. Higher plasma lactate in the autistic group is consistent with metabolic changes in some autistic children. The findings of altered brain NAA and lactate in autistic children suggest that MRS may be useful characterizing regional neurochemical and metabolic abnormalities in autistic children.

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    • "One study used MRS to measure NAA and lactate in 9 children with ASD and 5 control siblings in the frontal, temporal and cerebellar areas. An elevation in lactate was found in the frontal lobe of one of the 9 children (11%) with ASD, and NAA was reduced in the cerebellum of the ASD group as compared to the control group (Chugani et al., 1999). Another study of 45 children with ASD, 15 children with developmental delay and 13 TD children reported reduced NAA concentrations in the ASD group compared to the TD controls, but no significant difference in mean lactate levels (Friedman et al., 2003). "
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    • "One study used MRS to measure NAA and lactate in 9 children with ASD and 5 control siblings in the frontal, temporal and cerebellar areas. An elevation in lactate was found in the frontal lobe of one of the 9 children (11%) with ASD, and NAA was reduced in the cerebellum of the ASD group as compared to the control group (Chugani et al., 1999). Another study of 45 children with ASD, 15 children with developmental delay and 13 TD children reported reduced NAA concentrations in the ASD group compared to the TD controls, but no significant difference in mean lactate levels (Friedman et al., 2003). "
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    • "Isoleucine 0 , 3 , 2 ↔ Serum, plasma 5 (Croonenberghs et al., 2000; Aldred et al., 2003; Arnold et al., 2003; Adams et al., 2011; Shimmura et al., 2011) Lactate 6 , 0 , 1 ↔ Serum, plasma 7 (Moreno et al., 1992; László et al., 1994; Chugani et al., 1999; Oliveira et al., 2005; Weissman et al., 2008; Al-Mosalem et al., 2009; Giulivi et al., 2010) Leptin 6 , 0 , 1 ↔ Plasma, brain 4 (7 projects) (Vargas et al., 2005; Ashwood et al., 2008; Blardi et al., 2009; Blardi et al., 2010) Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α 0 , 1 , 2 ↔ Plasma 3 (Ashwood et al., 2010; Manzardo et al., 2012) Macrophage inflammatory protein-1β 1 , 1 , 1 ↔ Plasma 3 (Ashwood et al., 2010; Manzardo et al., 2012) Mitochondrial electron transport chain V 3 , 6 , 0 ↔ Brain 3 (9 projects) (Purcell et al., 2001; Sajdel-Sulkowska et al., 2011; Young et al., 2011) Oxytocine receptor (OXTR) 0 , 1 , 1 ↔ Brain 2 (Purcell et al., 2001; Fatemi et al., 2005) Oxytocin 0 , 3 , 0 ↔ Plasma 3 (Modahl et al., 1998; Green et al., 2001; Al-Ayadhi, 2005) Prolactin (PRL) 1 , 0 , 2 ↔ Serum, plasma 3 (Curin et al., 2003; Iwata et al., 2011) "
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