Article

Biological effects of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) extract

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
Phytotherapy Research (Impact Factor: 2.4). 06/1999; 13(4):344-5. DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1573(199906)13:4<344::AID-PTR436>3.0.CO;2-E
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The chloroform extract of nutmeg has been evaluated for antiinflammatory, analgesic and antithrombotic activities in rodents. The extract inhibited the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, produced a reduction in writhings induced by acetic acid in mice and offered protection against thrombosis induced by ADP/adrenaline mixture in mice.

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    ABSTRACT: In spite of wide spread biological uses of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg), there is a dearth of information on its effects on haematological indices. This work was therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of ethanolic extract of M. fragrans on some haematological indices using albino rat as a model. Twenty four (24) Wistar strain albino rats weighing 140 to 160 g were randomly distributed into four (4) groups of six (6) animals per group. Group I consists of rats which received 10 ml/kg normal saline (orally) and served as the control while those in Groups II, III and IV received 50% ethanolic seed extract of M. fragrans (orally) at doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In all groups, the blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture for analysis of haematological indices after feeding regimens lasted for 14 days. The results showed significant decreases (p< 0.05) in red blood cell (RBC) count, packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin concentration (HbC) and platelet count especially at high doses. There was significant increase (p< 0.05) in total white blood cell (WBC) count. This study therefore seems to confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of seed of M. fragrans and also suggests that it may have deleterious effects on haemopoiesis at high doses.
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    ABSTRACT: In spite of wide spread biological uses of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg), there is a dearth of information on its effects on haematological indices. This work was therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of ethanolic extract of M. fragrans on some haematological indices using albino rat as a model. Twenty four (24) Wistar strain albino rats weighing 140 to 160 g were randomly distributed into four (4) groups of six (6) animals per group. Group I consists of rats which received 10 ml/kg normal saline (orally) and served as the control while those in Groups II, III and IV received 50% ethanolic seed extract of M. fragrans (orally) at doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In all groups, the blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture for analysis of haematological indices after feeding regimens lasted for 14 days. The results showed significant decreases (p< 0.05) in red blood cell (RBC) count, packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin concentration (HbC) and platelet count especially at high doses. There was significant increase (p< 0.05) in total white blood cell (WBC) count. This study therefore seems to confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of seed of M. fragrans and also suggests that it may have deleterious effects on haemopoiesis at high doses.
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    ABSTRACT: Nutmeg, the seeds of Myritica fragrans (family Myristicaceae), is a well known kitchen spice with a long-standing reputation as a psychoactive herb. Nutmeg at high doses is considered a cheap substitute to several drugs of abuse. Earlier reports have attributed amphetamine-like activities to nutmeg. To characterize the neuropharmacological effects of different nutmeg extracts, administered orally and intraperitoneally, in comparison to Delta(9)-terahydrocannabinol, amphetamine, and morphine. Methanolic (ME), dichloromethane (DE), and hexane (HE) extracts were obtained from a chromatographically fingerprinted batch of nutmeg. Biological evaluation was conducted in sets of 6-8 mice in the tetrad assay at doses ranging from 100 to 500 and 500 to 1000 mg/kg for i.p. and oral administration, respectively. While oral administration of all the nutmeg extracts at 500 mg/kg caused a significant increase in locomotor activity, the i.p. administration of DE showed significant reduction in rectal temperature along with a significant increase in tail flick latency at 300 mg/kg. A significant decrease in core body temperature was observed with HE at 100 mg/kg, while higher doses caused significant increases in hot plate latency. Different behavioral effects were observed that varied by the type of extract as well as by the route of administration.
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