Article

Pulmonary tuberculosis: radiological features in west Africans coinfected with HIV.

Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Science & Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, West Africa.
British Journal of Radiology (Impact Factor: 1.53). 04/1999; 72(856):339-44. DOI: 10.1259/bjr.72.856.10474493
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A retrospective study was performed to document and compare the radiological appearances of newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in groups of West African patients with (n = 86) and without (n = 106) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Analysis of chest radiographs showed that the HIV-positive group had less consolidation (mean 3.1 zones vs 3.7 zones; p < 0.05), less apical involvement (64.0% vs 85.5%; p < 0.001), less bronchopulmonary spread (27.9% vs 58.5%; p < 0.001), less volume loss (53.5% vs 76.4%; p < 0.001) and less pleural thickening (46.5% vs 61.3%; p < 0.05) compared with the HIV-negative group. However, HIV-positive patients more commonly had pleural effusions (17.4% vs 6.6%; p < 0.05) and lymphadenopathy (9.3% vs 1.9%; p < 0.05). Previous studies on this subject from sub-Saharan Africa have focused either on selected patient groups likely to have more advanced immunosuppression or on smear-positive cases only, or where there has been only limited radiological documentation. This study suggests that the highly significant differences that exist may not be as frequent as previously shown. The lower frequencies of bronchopulmonary pattern of consolidation and pleural thickening in HIV-positive subjects have not previously been documented. The possible reasons for the altered radiographic appearance of PTB in HIV positive subjects are discussed.

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