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O tempora o mores: the cost of managing institutional outbreaks of scabies.

International Journal of Dermatology (Impact Factor: 1.23). 09/1999; 38(8):638-9.
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    Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, 2nd edited by Dean T Jamison, Joel G Breman, Anthony R Measham, George Alleyne, Mariam Claeson, David B Evans, Prabhat Jha, Anne Mills, Philip Musgrove, 01/2006: chapter Chapter 30; World Bank., ISBN: 0821361791

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