Article

Control of Boophilus annulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) on cattle using injectable microspheres containing ivermectin.

USDA-ARS, Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, Kerrville, TX 78028-9184, USA.
Journal of Economic Entomology (Impact Factor: 1.6). 10/1999; 92(5):1142-6.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The efficacy of an injectable microsphere formulation of ivermectin for control of the cattle tick, Boophilus annulatus (Say), was tested on 2 groups of 6 Hereford heifers held on separate 7-ha, tick-infested, buffel grass pastures. Cattle in one pasture were injected subcutaneously in the neck with a controlled-release microsphere formulation of ivermectin at the rate of 2.4 mg AI/kg body weight; the other group was injected with carrier only. Beginning 4 wk after injection and continuing throughout the remainder of the test (16 wk), no engorged ticks (> or = 5.5 mm) were found on any of the treated cattle, whereas large numbers of engorged ticks were found on the untreated controls. During this period, a few ticks were recovered from untreated sentinel animals placed in the treatment pasture during 7-8 wk after treatment, but none were recovered from animals exposed from 11-12 wk or 14-15 wk. Large numbers of B. annulatus ticks were found on untreated sentinel cattle placed in the control pasture during these same periods. Although the cattle, pastures, and tick habitat were approximately equal, the treated cattle gained an average of 77 kg compared with an average of 42 kg for the control group. This technology offers a possible alternative to the current official program of dipping and vacating pastures for eradication of Boophilus sp. infestations from the quarantine zone in southern Texas. Larger scale testing is needed to determine the potential of the injectable microsphere formulation and to optimize its use in eradication or control strategies.

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