Article

The role of zinc in wound healing.

Geriatric and Long Term Care Services, Ross Products Division, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, OH, USA.
Advances in wound care: the journal for prevention and healing 05/1999; 12(3):137-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Zinc deficiency has been associated with delayed wound healing. Because zinc deficiency may be common in the United States, foods rich in zinc, as well as all other essential nutrients, should be promoted in the diet of patients who are malnourished or at risk for malnutrition.

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