Article

Comparative susceptibility of two members of the Anopheles oswaldoi complex, An. oswaldoi and An. konderi, to infection by Plasmodium vivax.

Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (Impact Factor: 1.82). 01/1999; 93(4):381-4. DOI: 10.1016/S0035-9203(99)90123-2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We compared the susceptibility of Anopheles oswaldoi and An. konderi to infection by Plasmodium vivax based on the proportion of mosquitoes presenting oocysts and sporozoites. Anophelines were captured in the State of Acre and Rondônia, Brazilian Amazon, and used to obtain F1 progenies. After emergence of adults, male genitalia of mosquitoes of each family were dissected in order to identify them as either An. oswaldoi or An. konderi. F1 progenies of field-captured An. oswaldoi, An. konderi and An. darlingi (used as control) were fed simultaneously on P. vivax-infected blood. Mosquitoes were dissected on day 10-12 after feeding and examined for the presence of oocysts and sporozoites. Both An. oswaldoi and An. konderi developed oocysts in the midguts, however, the percentage of oocyst-positive mosquitoes for An. oswaldoi (13.8%) was higher than for An. konderi (3.3%), and only An. oswaldoi developed salivary infection with sporozoites (6.9% of positivity). Infection rates in An. darlingi ranged from 22.5% to 30.0% for both oocysts and sporozoites. These results indicate that An. oswaldoi can transmit P. vivax and suggest that it is more susceptible than An. konderi. Although An. oswaldoi is an exophilic and zoophilic species, it may be involved in malaria transmission as possibly occurred in the State of Acre.

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