Article

Controversies in community-based psychiatric epidemiology: let the data speak for themselves.

Department of Psychiatry, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.
Archives of General Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 13.75). 04/2000; 57(3):227-8. DOI: 10.1001/archpsyc.57.3.227
Source: PubMed
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