Article

Cell-cycle inhibitors: three families united by a common cause

Laboratory of Cell Cycle Regulation, Molecular Biology Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA.
Gene (Impact Factor: 2.08). 05/2000; 247(1-2):1-15. DOI: 10.1016/S0378-1119(00)00092-5
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In the cellular program leading to DNA synthesis, signals that drive cells into S-phase converge at the level of CDK activity. The products of at least three different gene families, Ink4, Cip/Kip and the pRb pocket-protein family, suppress S-phase entry. Ink4 proteins act by antagonizing the formation and activation of cyclin D-CDK4 complexes, of which the ultimate downstream target as related to S-phase entry appears to be pRb. Cip/Kip inhibitors impinge upon that pathway by inhibiting CDK2 kinases that participate in the inactivation of pRb and, like cyclin E, may also have roles independent of pRb. How the activities of these three classes of proteins are coordinated remains obscure. In recent years, development of mouse models has accelerated the elucidation of this complex network, showing roles that are sometimes cooperative and sometimes overlapping. We will discuss the interrelationships between Cip/Kip inhibitors and the components of the pRb pathway, and how their activities ultimately regulate cell proliferation.

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