Article

Evaluation of a clinical algorithm involving serum eosinophil cationic protein for guiding the anti-inflammatory treatment of bronchial asthma in childhood.

Division of Immunology/Hematology, University Children's Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland.
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (Impact Factor: 3.86). 05/2000; 11(2):87-94. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-3038.2000.00079.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A pilot study was performed to investigate a clinical algorithm using serum-eosinophil cationic protein level (S-ECP) as an objective parameter for tapering the anti-inflammatory treatment in chronic childhood asthma. We studied 21 outpatient asthmatic children (6 girls and 15 boys, mean age 9 yr, range 3-12 yr, all with initial S-ECP > or = 15 microg/l) over a period of 12 months at monthly intervals. At each visit a short history, clinical examination, blood sample for S-ECP and eosinophil count, lung function tests and drug compliance were assessed. According to the initial S-ECP, patients were allocated to two anti-inflammatory treatment groups: patients with S-ECP between 15 microg/l and 30 microg/l were treated with Budesonide 200 microg twice daily, while patients with S-ECP of 30 microg/l and above received Budesonide 400 microg twice daily. After this induction treatment the anti-inflammatory medication was tapered at monthly intervals according to actually measured S-ECP: patients with S-ECP < 15 microg/l received sodium cromoglycate (SCG) 10 mg twice daily per inhalation via spacer, patients with S-ECP > or = 15 microg/l and < 30 microg/l received Budesonide 200 microg twice daily via spacer, and patients with S-ECP > or = 30 microg/l received Budesonide 400 microg twice daily. Prior to inhalation of topical steroids or SCG all patients had to inhale 500 microg Terbutaline twice daily for optimal bronchodilatation. The use of medication was assessed by weighing the metered dose inhaler containers each month. Our results showed a decrease in symptoms (p = 0.0001) and in S-ECP (p= 0.02) and MEF50% predicted (p= 0.02) after the initial month of Budesonide treatment. During a total of 246 months of investigation there was no need for emergency room treatment or hospital admission, and no need for oral steroids. During the whole study period there was a tendency for inhaled steroids to be more effective than SCG in reduction of markers of airway inflammation, improvement of symptoms and lung function. Inadequate use of medication was related to an increase in S-ECP in all treatment groups. From this open pilot study it is concluded that a clinical algorithm including S-ECP for tapering the anti-inflammatory treatment may be helpful in childhood asthma. These first observations should be confirmed by a controlled long-term study.

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