Article

The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599-7400, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 4.23). 11/2000; 90(10):1619-22. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.90.10.1619
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program.
Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended.
The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained.
The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance.

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