Article

Local CD-ROM in interaction with HTML documents over the Internet.

Department of Periodontology, Center for Oral Health Sciences, Malmoe University, Malmoe, Sweden.
European Journal Of Dental Education (Impact Factor: 1.45). 09/2000; 4(3):124-7.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The internet and computer assisted learning have enhanced the possibilities of providing quality distance learning in dentistry. The use of multimedia material is an essential part of such distance learning courses. However the Internet technology available has limitations regarding transmission of large multimedia files. Therefore especially when addressing undergraduate students or geographically isolated professionals, large download times make distance learning unattractive. This problem was technically solved in a distance learning course for undergraduate students from all over Europe. The present communication describes a method to bypass the problem of transmitting large multimedia files by the use of a specially designed CD-ROM. This CD-ROM was run locally on the students' PC interacting with HTML documents sent over the Internet.

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    • "Only one of the 12 students indicated they had technical problems accessing the lectures off the CD-ROM disks on which the modules were distributed and that student was able to access the modules via the Web. Such combined Web and CD-ROM distance learning formats have been shown to be effective in a number of educational settings [6,7]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Problem Statement and Background – Medical education is increasingly being conducted in community-based teaching sites making it difficult to provide a consistent curriculum. We conducted a randomized trial to assess whether digital lectures could replace live lectures. Methods – Students were randomized to either attending a lecture series at our main campus or viewing digital versions of the same lectures at community sites. Both groups completed an examination based on the lectures and the group viewing the digital lectures completed a feedback form. Results – The group who viewed the digital lectures performed slightly better than the live lecture group however the differences were not statistically significant. Despite technical problems the students who viewed the digital lectures overwhelmingly felt the digital lectures could replace live lectures. Conclusions – Digital lectures appear to be a viable alternative to live lectures as a means of delivering didactic presentations in a community-based setting.
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