Article

Microencapsulation of ibuprofen and Eudragit RS 100 by the emulsion solvent diffusion technique.

Department of Pharmacy, University of Durban-Westville, Private Bag X54001, 4000, Kwazulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
International Journal of Pharmaceutics (Impact Factor: 3.99). 06/2001; 218(1-2):1-11. DOI: 10.1016/S0378-5173(00)00686-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The emulsion solvent diffusion was employed to prepare modified release microspheres of ibuprofen. The technique was optimised for the following processing variables: the absence/presence of baffles in the reaction vessel, agitation rate and drying time. Thereafter, the influence of various formulation factors on the microencapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release and micromeritic properties was examined. The variables included the methacrylic polymer, Eudragit(R) RS 100, ibuprofen content and the volume of ethanol used during microencapsulation. The results obtained were then interpreted on a triangular phase diagram to map the region of microencapsulation, as well as those formulations that yielded suitable modified release ibuprofen microspheres.

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