Article

Cost of treating heart failure in an Irish teaching hospital.

National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics, St James's Hospital, James's Street, Dublin 8.
Irish Journal of Medical Science (Impact Factor: 0.51). 01/2000; 169(4):241-4. DOI: 10.1007/BF03173523
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The prevalence of heart failure is 3 to 20 per 1,000 population, but may exceed 100 per 1,000 in the over 65 age group. Some 1-2% of the total healthcare budget is consumed in the management of heart failure.
As hospital costs account for approximately 70% of this expenditure we determined the cost of treating heart failure in an Irish teaching hospital.
Cost evaluation was from the hospital perspective using a microcosting detailed collection of resources used.
The average cost of a hospital admission for cardiac failure was IR 2,146 Pounds. The average cost per day was IR 193 Pounds. Approximately 75% of hospital costs were associated with ward costs. Medications accounted for 3.5% of total costs.
The availability of Irish cost data is essential for the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of heart failure in our healthcare system.

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