Article

Therapeutic potential of curcumin in human prostate cancer. III. Curcumin inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits angiogenesis of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in vivo

Molecular Urology Laboratory, Department of Urology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.
The Prostate (Impact Factor: 3.57). 01/2001; 47(4):293-303. DOI: 10.1002/pros.1074
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Earlier work from our laboratory highlighted the therapeutic potential of curcumin (turmeric), used as a dietary ingredient and as a natural anti-inflammatory agent in India and other Southeast Asian countries. This agent was shown to decrease the proliferative potential and induce the apoptosis potential of both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, largely by modulating the apoptosis suppressor proteins and by interfering with the growth factor receptor signaling pathways as exemplified by the EGF-receptor. To extend these observations made in vitro and to study the efficacy of this potential anti-cancer agent in vivo, the growth of LNCaP cells as heterotopically implanted tumors in nude mice was followed.
The androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells were grown, mixed with Matrigel and injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Experimental group received a synthetic diet containing 2% curcumin for up to 6 weeks. At the end point, sections taken from the excised tumors were evaluated for pathology, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vascularity.
Curcumin causes a marked decrease in the extent of cell proliferation as measured by the BrdU incorporation assay and a significant increase in the extent of apoptosis as measured by an in situ cell death assay. Moreover, a significant decrease in the microvessel density as measured by the CD31 antigen staining was also seen.
Curcumin could be a potentially therapeutic anti-cancer agent, as it significantly inhibits prostate cancer growth, as exemplified by LNCaP in vivo, and has the potential to prevent the progression of this cancer to its hormone refractory state.

0 Followers
 · 
133 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Curcuma longa Linnaeus and Zingiber officinale Roscoe are two main representatives of Zingiberaceae family studied for a wide range of therapeutic properties, including: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, antibacterial, analgesic, immunomodulatory, proapoptotic, anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties and anticancer effects. This study was aimed to analyse the ethanolic extracts of Curcuma rhizome (Curcuma longa Linnaeus) and Zingiber rhizome (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in terms of polyphenols, antioxidant activity and anti-melanoma potential employing the B164A5 murine melanoma cell line. In order to evaluate the total content of polyphenols we used Folin-Ciocâlteu method. The antioxidant activity of the two ethanolic extracts was determined by DPPH assay, and for the control of antiproliferative effect it was used MTT proliferation assay, DAPI staining and Annexin-FITC-7AAD double staining test. Results showed increased polyphenols amount and antioxidant activity for Curcuma rhizome ethanolic extract. Moreover, 100 μg/ml of ethanolic plant extract from both vegetal products presented in a different manner an antiproliferative, respectively a proapoptotic effect on the selected cell line. The study concludes that Curcuma rhizome may be a promising natural source for active compounds against malignant melanoma.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Melanoma is the most malignant skin cancer and is highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Curcumin is a component of turmeric, the yellow spice derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. It has been demonstrated to modulate multiple cell signaling pathways, including apoptosis, proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammation. In this study, we studied the signaling pathways involved in melanoma cell death after treatment with curcumin using western blotting. Colorimetric assays (MTT) assessed cell viability. Flow cytometry and DNA laddering evaluated cell apoptosis. Fluorescent microscopy was used to evaluate of Hoechst 33342 staining of nuclei. The result demonstrated that curcumin could induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in melanoma cells. Curcumin stimulated the expression of pro-apoptotic Bax, and inhibited the activation of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. During curcumin treatment, caspase-8 and Caspase-3 were cleaved in time and dose-dependent manners. Curcumin treatment also altered the expressions of apoptosis associated proteins NF-κB, p38 and p53. Curcumin induced DNA double strand breaks, which were indicated by phosphorylated H2AX. Our data suggested that curcumin could be used as a novel and effective approach for the treatment of melanoma.
    Molecular Biology Reports 09/2014; DOI:10.1007/s11033-014-3769-2 · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cancer is the most dreadful disease worldwide in terms of morbidity and mortality. The exact cause of cancer development and progression is not fully known. But it is thought that cancer occurs due to the structural and functional changes in the genes. The current approach to cancer treatment based on allopathic is expensive, exhibits side effects; and may also alter the normal functioning of genes. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control the cancer development and progression. Some medicinal plants provide a safe, effective and affordable remedy to control the progression of malignant cells. The importance of medicinal plants and their constituents has been documented in Ayurveda, Unani medicine, and various religious books. Curcumin, a vital constituent of the spice turmeric, is an alternative approach in the prevention of cancer. Earlier studies have shown the effect of curcumin as an antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumor and it also has a noteworthy role in the control of different diseases. In this review, we summarize the understanding of chemopreventive effects of curcumin in the prevention of cancer via the regulation of various cell signaling and genetic pathways.
    BioMed Research International 09/2014; 2014:761608. DOI:10.1155/2014/761608 · 2.71 Impact Factor