Article

Twenty-year evaluation of meniscal bearing and rotating platform knee replacements.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, USA.
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research (Impact Factor: 2.88). 08/2001; DOI: 10.1097/00003086-200107000-00008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Clinical results of the initial cemented and cementless series of 373 New Jersey Low Contact Stress total knee replacements in 282 patients surviving at least 10 years were analyzed using a strict knee scoring scale. The study showed excellent, good, fair, or poor results in 68.1%, 29.8%, 2.1%, or 0% of primary posterior cruciate-retaining meniscal bearing knee replacements, 46.7%, 53.3%, 0%, or 0% results in primary cemented rotating platform knee replacements, and 68.1%, 29.8%, 2.1%, or 0% results in primary cementless rotating platform knee replacements, respectively. Radiographic evaluation at minimum 10-year followup showed stable fixation of all components, no gross migration but significant osteolysis requiring bearing exchange and bone grafting in three cementless rotating platform knee replacements (1.8%) in three patients who underwent previous surgeries at an average of 10.2 years from the index surgery. Survivorship of the patients who underwent primary cementless posterior cruciate-retaining meniscal bearing knee replacements with an end point of revision for any mechanical reason was 97.4% at 10 years and 83% at 16 years; using an end point of a poor clinical knee score the survivorship was 98.9% at 10 years and at 16 years. Survivorship of the patients who underwent primary cemented rotating platform knee replacements with end points of revision for any mechanical reason or a poor clinical knee score was 97.7% at 10 years and at 20 years. Survivorship of the patients who underwent cementless rotating platform knee replacements with end points of revision for any mechanical reason or a poor clinical knee score was 98.3% at 10 years and at 18 years.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Jerry D'Alessio, Aug 11, 2014
4 Followers
 · 
274 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The mobile bearing designs have not yet been shown to improve clinical outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this prospective randomized study, we compared the short-term clinical results of a mobile bearing implant with those of the fixed bearing version of the same implant. We randomized 100 knees into two double-blind groups who received either the fixed (FB, 52 knees) or the mobile bearing (MB, 48 knees) version of the same implant. We used navigation to standardize the surgical technique. For up to one year, we recorded the Knee Society (KSS) and Oxford (OXF) scores. We performed an exploratory analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine the influence of baseline scores as covariate and the extent of improvement in clinical outcome over time. After one year, we did not detect any statistically significant difference between the two groups. The KSS scores differed by 2 points, the OXF scores by 1.1 points. Even with identical geometry of implant surfaces and a navigated surgical technique, first-year results do not support a preference for either a fixed or a mobile design.
    The Open Orthopaedics Journal 05/2011; 5:201-8. DOI:10.2174/1874325001105010201
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Total knee prostheses with a mobile-bearing insert were developed to provide nonconstrained joint range of motion while reducing friction forces. The purpose of this study was, based on weightbearing X-rays, to evaluate the mobility of the polyethylene tibial insert in relation to the femoral and tibial components. We studied the results of a cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA) retaining the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), with a mobile-bearing platform in rotation and anteroposterior translation (Innex Anterior-Posterior Glide, Zimmer) with a mean 23-month follow-up duration after surgery. Both anterior-posterior tibiofemoral translation and intraprosthetic axial rotation occur between the mobile polyethylene insert and the tibial endplate. In a series of 51 primary TKA, the three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the femoral, tibial, and mobile insert components were determined using a computerized matching system between the prosthetic 3D models and the radiographic images of the implants on three lateral follow-up weightbearing knee X-rays: films were taken in full extension, at 45 degrees flexion, and at maximum flexion. There was a statistically significant increase in the internal rotation of the mobile tray with flexion, (up to a mean -3+/-3 degrees between the femoral box and the mobile tray [p<0.0001] and up to a mean -5+/-7 degrees between the tibial tray and the mobile tray [p<0.0001]). The mobile tray did not translate in relation to the tibial endplate from extension to 45 degrees flexion (0+/-2 mm [range: -5 to 6 mm]). However, from 45 degrees to maximum flexion, a statistically significant mean 1+/-2 mm (range: -2 to 9 mm) of anterior translation (p<0.0001) was found. The extent of insert mobility varies from one study to another. Some have reported relatively limited mobility stemming from a superior surface that is not highly congruent, (thus allowing anterior-posterior and mediolateral translation through gliding of the femur in contact with the insert). Other studies have reported mobile-bearing tray mobility in relation to the tibial endplate and minimal rotation at the femoral component level. In this series of PCL retaining TKA with a mobile-bearing platform, the mobile-bearing platform showed a progressive increase in internal rotation during flexion. Most of this rotational mobility occurred between the mobile platform and the tibial endplate, confirming our hypothesis. However, with flexion, the femoral component increased its mobility relatively to the platform. During flexion, an anterior-posterior translation occurred between the femoral implant and the tibial insert, and between the tibial insert and the tibial endplate, but the direction of the mobile tibial insert translation remained unpredictable with this nonconstrained implant design used. Level IV. Prospective non-controlled therapeutic study.
    Orthopaedics & Traumatology Surgery & Research 06/2009; 95(4):254-9. DOI:10.1016/j.otsr.2009.03.012 · 1.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo review the clinical and radiological results of a series of rotating platform knee arthroplasties with a follow-up of 6–12 years.
    Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología 01/2009; 53(1). DOI:10.1016/j.recot.2008.02.001