Article

Some clinical factors related to rate of resorption of residual ridges. 1962.

Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry (Impact Factor: 1.42). 09/2001; 86(2):119-25.
Source: PubMed
0 Followers
 · 
180 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Accurate implant placement in the anterior maxilla is essential in achieving optimal prosthetic rehabilitation with proper function and acceptable esthetic and phonetic demands. One of the preferable prosthetic solutions to restore a missing maxillary incisor in young adults is by an implant-supported crown. Bone resorption together with an enlarged incisive foramen, challenge proper implant placement. A simultaneous procedure where the implant osteotomy site penetrated the incisive canal is presented. A configurated cortico-cancellous block graft core was adjusted to fit the foramen while its soft tissue content was pushed back posteriorly but not removed. This procedure was followed by an immediate implant placement. Re-entry at 9 months revealed solid bone support embracing the implant body. Although the size of the incisive foramen diminished significantly, the nasopalatine branches were still evident. No complications and/or loss of sensation were observed.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 11/2000; 11(5):505-10. · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This 3D-finite elements method study evaluated the effect of bone resorption on the stress distribution in overdentures with bone loss surrounding implants and resorption of the distal ridge. METHODS: Tridimensional models were built from the images of a computerized tomography of a mandible and 3D laser digitalization of implants, abutments, mucosa, and complete denture. The geometric models of implants and abutments were mounted at the canine region to build reference model 1 - absence of bone resorption. To build the test models the mandible geometric solid was modified to simulate 2-mm vertical bone loss surrounding the implants (model 2) and resorption of the distal ridge (model 3). Finite elements models were generated, and a 100 N static load was applied at the first molar region of each model to compare the von Mises stress distributions in selected points. RESULTS: Von Mises stresses increased on the bone surrounding implants and on the prosthetic components in the model with 2-mm vertical bone loss. The combination of 2-mm vertical bone loss and resorption of the distal ridge did not increase the stresses compared with the model with only bone loss surrounding implants. The highest stress concentration at marginal bone and implants occurred on the same side of the vertical load application for all models. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the bone loss surrounding implants increases stress concentration in dental implants, abutments, and marginal bone independently from the bone resorption of the distal ridge.
    12/2011; 27(1):41-46. DOI:10.1590/S1980-65232012000100008
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The post-extraction resorption of residual ridges (RRR) is a major and largely unsolved health problem, probably of multifactorial etiology. In order for one to study the role of specific factors in the pathophysiology of RRR, the use of animal models is desirable. The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable animal model and a standardized assay system to measure RRR for future experiments. A new oblique cephalometric device was designed to take pairs of xeroradiographs on the right and left sides of the rat skull and mandible at a 45-degree angle to the horizontal plane. Preliminary studies confirmed the reproducibility of the technique. All molars were extracted with minimal trauma from the right maxilla and mandible in five male Sprague-Dawley rats (40 days old). Longitudinal cephalographic examinations were performed before and immediately after extraction and at two, four, eight, and 12 weeks after extraction. Alveolar bone resorption was measured on enlarged cephalographs (5.7 X) at a point mesial to the mandibular first molar. Sequential mean bone resorption was 0.8 +/- 0.2 mm (S.D.), 1.0 +/- 0.3, 1.3 +/- 0.3, and 1.5 +/- 0.4, respectively. Graphically, these findings produced bone loss curves similar to those observed in man. These results indicate that the rat model may be utilized in longitudinal studies of the resorption of the residual ridge.
    Journal of Dental Research 01/1988; 66(12):1753-7. DOI:10.1177/00220345870660121101 · 4.14 Impact Factor