Article

Gabapentin-induced worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with lewy bodies: case reports.

Istituto di Clinica delle Malattie Nervose e Mentali, Università 'La Sapienza', Roma, Italia.
European Neurology (Impact Factor: 1.5). 02/2002; 47(1):56-7. DOI: 10.1159/000047948
Source: PubMed
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