Article

First, do no harm: a call for emphasizing adherence and HIV prevention interventions in active antiretroviral therapy programs in the developing world.

AIDS (Impact Factor: 6.56). 04/2002; 16(4):676-8. DOI: 10.1097/00002030-200203080-00025
Source: PubMed
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