Article

Mapping susceptibility genes for the induction of pulmonary fibrosis in mice

University of Rochester Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
Chest (Impact Factor: 7.13). 04/2002; 121(3 Suppl):21S. DOI: 10.1378/chest.121.3_suppl.21S
Source: PubMed

Full-text

Available from: Clare Baecher-Allan, May 20, 2014
0 Followers
 · 
59 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In humans, a number of genetic factors have been linked to the development of fibrosis in a variety of different organs. Seeking a wider understanding of this observation in man is ethically important. There is mounting evidence suggesting that inbred mouse strains with different genetic backgrounds demonstrate variable susceptibility to a fibrotic injury. We performed a systematic review of the literature describing strain and organ specific response to injury in order to determine whether genetic susceptibility plays a role in fibrogenesis. Data were collected from studies that were deemed eligible for analysis based on set inclusion criteria, and findings were assessed in relation to strain of mouse, type of injury and organ of investigation. A total of 44 studies were included covering 21 mouse strains and focusing on fibrosis in the lung, liver, kidney, intestine and heart. There is evidence that mouse strain differences influence susceptibility to fibrosis and this appears to be organ specific. For instance, C57BL/6J mice are resistant to hepatic, renal and cardiac fibrosis but susceptible to pulmonary and intestinal fibrosis. However, BALB/c mice are resistant to pulmonary fibrosis but susceptible to hepatic fibrosis. Few studies have assessed the effect of the same injury stimulus in different organ systems using the same strains of mouse. Such mouse strain studies may prove useful in elucidating the genetic as well as epigenetic factors in humans that could help determine why some people are more susceptible to the development of certain organ specific fibrosis than others.
    Fibrogenesis & Tissue Repair 09/2013; 6(1):18. DOI:10.1186/1755-1536-6-18
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The antineoplastic drug bleomycin leads to the side effect of pulmonary fibrosis in both humans and mice. We challenged genetically diverse inbred lines of mice from the Collaborative Cross with bleomycin to determine the heritability of this phenotype. Sibling pairs of mice from 40 lines were treated with bleomycin. Lung disease was assessed by scoring lung pathology and by measuring soluble collagen levels in lavage fluid. Serum micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) were also measured. Inbred sibling pairs of animals demonstrated high coinheritance of the phenotypes of disease susceptibility or disease resistance. The plasma levels of one miRNA were clearly correlated in sibling mice. The results showed that, as in humans, the lines that comprise the Collaborative Cross exhibited wide genetic variation in response to this drug. This finding suggests that the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross animals may reveal drug effects that might be missed if a study were based on a conventional mouse strain.
    Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine 07/2011; 4:35-45. DOI:10.2147/PGPM.S22475
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is clear evidence that environmental exposures and genetic predisposition contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Cigarette smoking increases the risk of developing IPF several-fold, as do other exposures such as metal-fume and wood-dust exposure. Occupations that increase the risk of IPF are agricultural work, hairdressing, and stone polishing, supporting the role of environmental exposure in disease pathogenesis. Genetic predisposition to IPF is evident from its familial aggregation and the fact that pulmonary fibrosis develops in several rare genetic disorders. Mutations in surfactant proteins lead to pulmonary fibrosis and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in alveolar type II epithelial cells. Mutations in telomerase have been found in several families with IPF, and shortened telomeres are found in sporadic cases of IPF. A common variant in mucin 5B predisposes to both familial and sporadic IPF and is present in the majority of cases, indicating sporadic IPF occurs in those with genetic predisposition. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Medicine Volume 64 is January 07, 2013. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.
    Annual review of medicine 09/2012; DOI:10.1146/annurev-med-042711-142004 · 15.48 Impact Factor