Article

Pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy.

1st Dept of Neurology, University Hospital, LFUK, Mickiewiczova 13, 813 69 Bratislava, Slovakia.
Bratislavske lekarske listy (Impact Factor: 0.47). 02/2002; 103(1):26-9.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Chronic alcoholism is a medical, economical and social problem. Motility and mental function disorders are among the complications of chronic alcoholism and have been known for more than two centuries as "alcoholic paralysis", and are caused by alcoholic neuropathy. The pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy does not appear to be identical with central nervous system disorders which are caused by chronic alcoholism and it seems that it results from a failure of the protection barrier systems in the peripheral nervous system. To the pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy includes: 1. direct toxic effects of alcohol on the cellular population of the central nervous system and other tissues, especially of parenchymatous organs (in particular of the liver), 2. indirect metabolic and exotoxic changes mediated by malabsorption, maldigestion and secondary caloric and energy deprivation, 3. effects of genetic factors. (Fig. 2, Ref. 23.)

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