Article

Hard tissue formation on dentin surfaces applied with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in the connective tissue of the palate.

Department of Oral Health Science, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
Journal of Periodontal Research (Impact Factor: 1.99). 06/2002; 37(3):204-9. DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0765.2002.01611.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether hard tissue might be formed on dentin surfaces applied with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in palatal connective tissue. Fifty-eight dentin blocks were prepared from rat roots, demineralized with 24% EDTA (pH 7.0), applied with 0, 50 and 100 microgram/ml rhBMP-2, and labeled as groups 0, 50 and 100. The dentin blocks were then transplanted into palatal connective tissue of rats, and specimens were prepared at two and four weeks after surgery for histologic and histomorphometric examinations. The results showed that the percentage of newly formed hard tissue in relation to the total dentin block surface length in groups 0, 50 and 100 was 0.0%, 2.8% and 4.4% at two weeks, and 0.0%, 1.6% and 12.8% at four weeks, respectively. New hard tissue formation in groups 50 and 100 was significantly promoted as compared to group 0 (p < 0.01). These findings thus indicate that rhBMP-2 application to dentin enhanced new hard tissue formation on dentin surfaces in the connective tissue of the palate.

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