Article

Comparative efficacy and safety of 5-day cefaclor and 10-day amoxycillin treatment of group A Streptococcal pharyngitis in children

Pediatric Department I, University of Milan, Via Commenda 9, 20122 Milan, Italy.
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents (Impact Factor: 4.26). 08/2002; 20(1):28-33. DOI: 10.1016/S0924-8579(02)00118-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A total of 384 children with group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis were randomized to receive either 40 mg/kg/day of cefaclor in two doses for 5 days (192 patients), or 40 mg/kg/day of amoxycillin in three doses for 10 days (192 patients). The signs and symptoms of pharyngitis were recorded and throat cultures were obtained at presentation and on days 6-7, 11-15, 16-20 and 28-35. Patient compliance was significantly higher in the children treated with cefaclor (100 vs. 95.1%; P = 0.003). At the end of follow-up, the percentage of clinical success was 91.4% for cefaclor and 91.9% for amoxycillin (P = 0.974); bacteriological success was obtained in 85.7 and 89.6% children (P = 0.348), respectively. Both treatments were well-tolerated with adverse event rates of 8.3% in the cefaclor group and 9.4% in the amoxcillin group (P = 0.857). Our study shows that five days' treatment with cefaclor is as effective and safe as the conventional 10-day course of amoxycillin in the treatment of GABHS pharyngitis, but compliance seems to be significantly greater.

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