Article

Risperidone decreases craving and relapses in individuals with schizophrenia and cocaine dependence

Department of Veterans Affairs, VISN 3 Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center, Lyons, New Jersey, USA.
Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie (Impact Factor: 2.41). 10/2002; 47(7):671-5.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine the efficacy of atypical neuroleptics for decreasing craving and drug relapses during protracted withdrawal in individuals dually diagnosed with schizophrenia and cocaine dependence.
We conducted a 6-week, open-label pilot study comparing risperidone with typical neuroleptics in a sample of withdrawn cocaine-dependent schizophrenia patients.
Preliminary results suggest that individuals treated with risperidone had significantly less cue-elicited craving and substance abuse relapses at study completion. Further, they showed a trend toward a greater reduction in negative and global symptoms of schizophrenia.
Atypical neuroleptics may help reduce craving and relapses in this population. Future research should include more rigorous double-blind placebo-controlled studies with this class of medications.

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Available from: David A Smelson, Jan 08, 2015
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