Article

Six- and 24-month follow-up of pool exercise therapy and education for patients with fibromyalgia.

Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 2.22). 02/2002; 31(5):306-10. DOI:10.1080/030097402760375223
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To follow patients with fibromyalgia six and 24 months after they finished a six-month treatment programme. The programme comprised pool exercise therapy, adjusted to the patients' limitations, and education based on their health problems.
Twenty-six patients were examined six and 24 months after the completion of the treatment programme with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), SF-36, the 6-minute walk test, and the Grippit measure. The values obtained at the follow-up examinations were compared with the baseline and post-treatment values.
As compared with baseline, symptom severity (FIQ, SF-36), physical function (FIQ, SF-36, 6-minute walk test) and quality of life (SF-36) still showed improvements six months after the completion of treatment (p <0.05). Pain (FIQ, SF-36), fatigue (FIQ, SF-36), walking ability, and social function (SF-36) still showed improvements 2 years after the completion of the programme as compared with the baseline values (p < 0.05). No significant changes were found for these variables, when the values obtained at the two follow-up examinations were compared with those of the post-treatment examination.
Improvements in symptom severity, physical function and social function were still found six and 24 months after the completed treatment programme.

0 0
 · 
0 Bookmarks
 · 
46 Views
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective:To assess the effectiveness of aquatic physical therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia.Data sources:The search strategy was undertaken using the following databases, from 1950 to December 2012: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, SCIELO, WEB OF SCIENCE, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Library Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Disease Group Trials Register, PEDro and DARE.Review methods:The studies were separated into groups: Group I - aquatic physical therapy × no treatment, Group II - aquatic physical therapy × land-based exercises and Group III - aquatic physical therapy × other treatments.Results:Seventy-two abstracts were found, 27 of which met the inclusion criteria. For the functional ability (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), three studies were considered with a treatment time of more than 20 weeks and a mean difference (MD) of -1.35 [-2.04; -0.67], P = 0.0001 was found in favour of the aquatic physical therapy group versus no treatment. The same results were identified for stiffness and the 6-minute walk test where two studies were pooled with an MD of -1.58 [-2.58; -0.58], P = 0.002 and 43.5 (metres) [3.8; 83.2], P = 0.03, respectively.Conclusion:Three meta-analyses showed statistically significant results in favour of the aquatic physical therapy (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, stiffness and the 6-minute walk test) during a period of longer than 20 weeks. Due to the low methodological rigor, the results were insufficient to demonstrate statistical and clinical differences in most of the outcomes.
    Clinical Rehabilitation 07/2013; · 2.19 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disorder that can have a devastating effect on patients' lives. This study assessed the efficacy of a 6-week interdisciplinary treatment that combines coordinated PSYchological, Medical, Educational, and PHYsiotherapeutic interventions (PSYMEPHY) compared with standard pharmacologic care. The study was a randomized controlled trial (54 participants in the PSYMEPHY group and 56 in the control group [CG] ) with follow-up at 6 months. PSYMEPHY patients were also assessed at 12 months. The main outcomes were changes in total Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, pain, fatigue, morning tiredness, anxiety, and use of pain coping strategies as measured by the FIQ, the visual analog scale, and the Coping with Chronic Pain Questionnaire. After the 6-month assessment, patients in the CG were offered the PSYMEPHY treatment, and completed all of the instruments immediately after treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits (N = 93). Subjects received therapy at two different outpatient clinical locations. Fibromyalgia patients. Six months after the intervention, significant improvements in total FIQ score (P = 0.04), and pain (P = 0.03) were seen in the PSYMEPHY group compared with controls. Twelve months after the intervention, all patients in the PSYMEPHY group maintained statistically significant improvements in total FIQ score, and pain, and showed an improvement in fatigue, rested, anxiety, and current pain compared with baseline. Data from the control patients who underwent the PSYMEPHY intervention corroborated the initial results. This study highlights the beneficial effects of an interdisciplinary treatment for FM patients in a hospital pain management unit. A 6-week interdisciplinary intervention showed significant improvement in key domains of fibromyalgia, as quality of life, pain, fatigue, rested, and anxiety at 12 months.
    Pain Medicine 02/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES:: To evaluate the feasibility of a randomized-controlled trial and to obtain estimates of the effects of combined cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and milnacipran for the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS:: Fifty-eight patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to 1 of the 3 treatment arms: (1) combination therapy (n=20); (2) milnacipran+education (n=19); and (3) placebo+CBT (n=19). Patients received either milnacipran (100 mg/d) or placebo. Patients also received 8 sessions of phone-delivered CBT or educational instructions, but only from baseline to week 9. Assessments were conducted at baseline, week 9, and 21. The primary endpoints were baseline to week 21 changes in weekly average pain intensity and physical function (SF-36 physical function scale). RESULTS:: Compared with milnacipran, combination therapy demonstrated a moderate effect on improving SF-36 physical function [SE=9.42 (5.48), P=0.09, effect size=0.60] and in reducing weekly average pain intensity [mean difference (SE)=-1.18 (0.62), P=0.07, effect size=0.67]. Compared with milnacipran, CBT had a moderate to large effect in improving SF-36 physical function [mean difference (SE)=11.0 (5.66), P=0.06, effect size=0.70]. Despite the presence of concomitant centrally acting therapies, dropout rate was lower than anticipated (15% at week 21). Importantly, at least 6 out of the 8 phone-based therapy sessions were successfully completed by 89% of the patients; and adherence to the treatment protocols was >95%. CONCLUSIONS:: In this pilot study, a therapeutic approach that combines phone-based CBT and milnacipran was feasible and acceptable. Moreover, the preliminary data supports conducting a fully powered randomized-controlled trial.Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01038323.
    The Clinical journal of pain 02/2013; · 3.01 Impact Factor