Article

Spectral karyotyping identifies recurrent complex rearrangements of chromosomes 8, 17, and 20 in osteosarcomas.

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Genes Chromosomes and Cancer (Impact Factor: 3.55). 02/2003; 36(1):7-16. DOI: 10.1002/gcc.10132
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Conventional cytogenetic studies have shown that osteosarcomas (OSs) are often highly aneuploid, with a large number of both structural and numerical chromosomal alterations. To investigate the complexity of OS karyotypes in detail, we applied spectral karyotyping (SKY) to a series of 14 primary OS tumors and four established OS cell lines. A total of 531 rearrangements were identified by SKY, of which 300 breakpoints could be assigned to a specific chromosome band. There was an average of 38.5 breakpoints identified by SKY per primary tumor. Chromosome 20 was involved in a disproportionately high number of structural rearrangements, with 38 different aberrations being detected. Chromosomal rearrangements between chromosomes 20 and 8 were evident in four tumors. FISH analysis using a 20q13 subtelomeric probe identified frequent involvement of 20q in complex structural rearrangements of OS cell lines. Characterization of the structural aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 17 by use of SKY demonstrated frequent duplication or partial gains of chromosome bands 8q23-24 and 17p11-13. Other chromosomes frequently involved in structural alteration were chromosomes 1 (47 rearrangements) and 6 (38 rearrangements). Centromeric rearrangements often involving chromosomes 1, 6, 13, 14, 17, and 20 were present. Four of the 14 primary OS tumors were characterized by nonclonal changes that included both structural and numerical alterations. In summary, OS tumors have a very high frequency of structural and numerical alterations, compounded by gross changes in ploidy. This intrinsic karyotype instability leads to a diversity of rearrangements and the acquisition of composite chromosomal rearrangements, with the highest frequency of alteration leading to gain of 8q23-24 and 17p11-13 and rearrangement of 20q. These findings suggest that specific sequences mapping to these chromosomal regions will likely have a role in the development and progression of OS.

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