Article

Use of patient age and anti-Ro/La antibody status to determine the probability of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and sicca symptoms fulfilling criteria for secondary Sjogren's syndrome

University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 4.44). 02/2003; 42(1):189-91. DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/keg048
Source: PubMed
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