Article

External incentives, information technology, and organized processes to improve health care quality for patients with chronic diseases.

Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Ave, MC 2007, Chicago, Ill 60637, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 01/2003; 289(4):434-41.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Organized care management processes (CMPs) can improve health care quality for patients with chronic diseases. The Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences has called for public and private purchasers of health care to create incentives for physician organizations (POs) to use CMPs and for the government to assist POs in implementing information technology (IT) to facilitate CMP use. Research is lacking about the extent to which POs use CMPs or about the degree to which incentives, IT, or other factors are associated with their use.
To determine the extent to which POs with 20 or more physicians use CMPs and to identify key factors associated with CMP use for 4 chronic diseases (asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes).
One thousand five hundred eighty-seven US POs (medical groups and independent practice associations) with 20 or more physicians were identified using 5 large databases. One thousand one hundred four of these POs (70%) agreed to participate in a telephone survey conducted between September 2000 and September 2001. Sixty-four responding POs were excluded because they did not treat any of the 4 diseases, leaving 1040 POs.
Extent of use of CMPs as calculated on the basis of a summary measure, a PO care management index (POCMI; range, 0-6) and factors associated with CMP use.
Physician organizations' mean use of CMPs was 5.1 of a possible 16; 50% used 4 or fewer. External incentives and clinical IT were most strongly associated with CMP use. Controlling for other factors, use of the 2 most strongly associated incentives-public recognition and better contracts for health care quality-was associated with use of 1.3 and 0.7 additional CMPs, respectively (P<.001 and P =.007). Each additional IT capability was associated with 0.37 additional CMPs (P<.001). However, 33% of POs reported no external incentives and 50% reported no clinical IT capability.
The use of CMPs varies greatly among POs, but it is low on average. Government and private purchasers of health care may increase CMP use by providing external incentives for improvement of health care quality to POs and by assisting them in improving their clinical IT capability.

1 Follower
 · 
99 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recognizing the gap between high-quality care and the care actually provided, health care providers across the country are under increasing institutional and payer pressures to move toward more high-quality care. This pressure is often leveraged through data feedback on provider performance; however, feedback has been shown to have only a variable effect on provider behavior. This study examines the cognitive behavioral factors that influence providers to participate in feedback interventions, and how feedback interventions should be implemented to encourage more provider engagement and participation.
    The Journal of ambulatory care management 04/2015; 38(2):118-24. DOI:10.1097/JAC.0000000000000055
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.
  • The Gerontologist 10/2007; 47(5):697-704. DOI:10.1093/geront/47.5.697 · 2.48 Impact Factor

Preview (2 Sources)

Download
1 Download
Available from