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    ABSTRACT: There are a number of options available to manage the patella when revising a failed total knee arthroplasty. If the previous patellar component is well-fixed, undamaged, not worn, and compatible with the femoral revision component, then it can be retained. When a patellar component necessitates revision and is removed with adequate remaining patellar bone stock, an onlay-type all-polyethylene cemented implant can be used. Management of the patella with severe bony deficiency remains controversial. Treatment options for the severely deficient patella include the use of a cemented all-polyethylene biconvex patellar prosthesis, patellar bone grafting and augmentation, patellar resection arthroplasty (patelloplasty), performing a gull-wing osteotomy, patellectomy, or the use of newer technology such as a tantalum (trabecular metal) patellar prosthesis. Severe patellar bone deficiency is a challenging situation because restoration of the extensor mechanism, proper patellar tracking, and satisfactory anatomic relationships with the femoral and tibial components are critical for an optimal clinical outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 09/2008; 466(11):2790-7. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A total of 1,401 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKA) were reviewed; 44 (3.2%) had at least the patellar component revised. Nine of these knees (eight patients) had insufficient bone stock to allow reimplantation of another patellar component. Clinical data on the nine knees were obtained with recent follow-up evaluation, review of their medical records and radiographs. Evaluation included Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Average follow-up was 4 years and 7 months, 2-year range (2 months to 8 years and 4 months). Common factors found in these nine knees included: thin patella after primary TKR status, osteoarthritis, good range of motion and patella alta. Results were good to excellent in seven knees and fair in two. The untoward associations with patellectomy such as quadriceps lag, extension weakness and anterior knee pain were not experienced. Resection of the patellar component, without reimplantation, is an acceptable alternative in revision TKA lacking adequate remaining bone stock.
    International Orthopaedics 11/2008; 33(6):1591-6. · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conversion of a knee arthrodesis to a Total Knee Arthroplasty is an uncommon procedure. Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty in this setting presents the surgeon with a number of challenges including the management of the extensor mechanism and patella. We describe a unique case of a 69 years old Caucasian man who underwent a revision Total Knee Arthroplasty using a tibial tubercle osteotomy after a previous conversion of a knee arthrodesis without patella resurfacing. Unfortunately 9 months following surgery a tibial tubercle pseudarthrosis and spontaneous patella fracture occurred. Both were managed with open reduction and internal fixation. At 30 months follow-up the tibial tubercle osteotomy had completely consolidated while the patella fracture was still evident but with no signs of further displacement. The patient was completely satisfied with the outcome and had a painless range of knee flexion between 0-95[degree sign]. We believe that patients undergoing this type of surgery require careful counseling regarding the risk of complications both during and after surgery despite strong evidence supporting improved functional outcomes.
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 11/2013; 14(1):317. · 1.88 Impact Factor