Article

Diagnosis and management of epilepsy.

Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology, London Health Sciences Centre - University Campus, London, ON.
Canadian Medical Association Journal (Impact Factor: 6.47). 03/2003; 168(4):441-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article concisely describes the more common epilepsy conditions and will enable physicians to efficiently evaluate and manage these disorders. Salient aspects of the history and examination, together with electroencephalography, will usually determine the epilepsy syndrome (category), forming the basis for any further investigation and possible antiepileptic therapy. Imaging may be required in some circumstances.

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