Article

Use Of The Health Care For The Homeless Program Services And Other Health Care Services By Homeless Adults

Special Populations Research Branch, Division of Programs for Special Populations, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved (Impact Factor: 1.1). 03/2003; 14(1):87-99. DOI: 10.1353/hpu.2010.0830
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study examined factors associated with the use of the Health Care for the Homeless Program and other health care services by homeless adults. A total of 941 homeless adults were identified in 52 soup kitchens in U.S. communities. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were applied. Among homeless adults, having dental problems was the most robust factor associated with their use of Health Care for the Homeless Program services (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.44-4.32). Among homeless adults who did not visit Health Care for the Homeless Program services during last six months, the number of emergency room visits was the most powerful factor associated with their use of other health care services (OR = 1.15, 95 percent CI = 1.05-1.26). The results of the study can help health care providers better serve homeless adults to meet their health needs.

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