Article

GUGULIPID: a natural cholesterol-lowering agent.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.
Annual Review of Nutrition (Impact Factor: 10.46). 02/2003; 23:303-13. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.nutr.23.011702.073102
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The resin of the Commiphora mukul tree has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2000 years to treat a variety of ailments. Studies in both animal models and humans have shown that this resin, termed gum guggul, can decrease elevated lipid levels. The stereoisomers E- and Z-guggulsterone have been identified as the active agents in this resin. Recent studies have shown that these compounds are antagonist ligands for the bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. It is likely that this effect accounts for the hypolipidemic activity of these phytosteroids.

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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
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