Article

Shift of whispering-gallery modes in microspheres by protein adsorption

The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
Optics Letters (Impact Factor: 3.18). 03/2003; 28(4):272-4. DOI: 10.1364/OL.28.000272
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Biosensors based on the shift of whispering-gallery modes in microspheres accompanying protein adsorption are described by use of a perturbation theory. For random spatial adsorption, theory predicts that the shift should be inversely proportional to microsphere radius R and proportional to protein surface density and excess polarizability. Measurements are found to be consistent with the theory, and the correspondence enables the average surface area occupied by a single protein to be estimated. These results are consistent with crystallographic data for bovine serum albumin. The theoretical shift for adsorption of a single protein is found to be extremely sensitive to the target region, with adsorption in the most sensitive region varying as 1/R(5/2). Specific parameters for single protein or virus particle detection are predicted.

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