Article

Mild cognitive impairment: Can FDG-PET predict who is to rapidly convert to Alzheimer's disease?

INSERM EO 218, University of Caen, Cyceron PET Center, France.
Neurology (Impact Factor: 8.3). 05/2003; 60(8):1374-7. DOI: 10.1212/01.WNL.0000055847.17752.E6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were assessed, and a metabolic profile associated with conversion to AD at 18-month follow-up was sought. As compared with nonconverters (n = 10), converters (n = 7) had lower fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the right temporoparietal cortex (p = 0.02, corrected for cluster size), without individual overlap. Awaiting replication in an independent sample, these findings suggest that among patients with MCI, fluorodeoxyglucose PET may accurately identify rapid converters.

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