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Leptospira in slaughtered fattening pigs in southern Vietnam: presence of the bacteria in the kidneys and association with morphological findings

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Centre of Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), Uppsala, Sweden.
Veterinary Microbiology (Impact Factor: 2.73). 07/2003; 93(4):361-8. DOI: 10.1016/S0378-1135(03)00042-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT One kidney was collected from each of 32 fattening pigs at an abattoir in southern Vietnam in 2001 in order to demonstrate infecting Leptospira serovar and to associate renal macro- and microscopic findings with the presence of renal leptospires. Leptospires were demonstrated in 22 (69%) of the investigated kidneys by immunofluorescence. Multifocal interstitial nephritis (MFIN) and gross renal lesions (white spots) were each demonstrated in 24 (75%) kidneys. Leptospira interrogans serovar bratislava was isolated from one kidney. There was no association between presence of leptospires and MFIN (P=0.19), respectively and white spots (P=0.98), respectively. These data suggest that Leptospira infection is common among fattening pigs in the study area and that these animals may be considered as an occupational human health hazard. It is also suggested that the presence of white spots is an unreliable indicator of the presence of renal leptospires.

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